Internet Outage in Searcy Impacts HST Community

August 28, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

Internet service went out on the Searcy campus on Monday. AT&T is working hard to resolve the issue, but as of yet they have not given us an ETA for repairing the problem.

Although our internet service is not affected on the Memphis campus, we rely on various services provided by servers in Searcy. This has impacted our online learning environment, Canvas, as well as school email addresses, and registration and other Pipeline services.

There are two major implications:

1. Students, do your best to do your work! Faculty will not hold students responsible for turning in assignments on Canvas while Canvas is down.

2. If you need to contact someone at HST, email is not reliable right now. Please call, use social media, or use a non-HST email address.

To keep up-to-date, follow HST on Twitter or Facebook.

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Chapel at HST

August 21, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

chapel

Chapel is a special time of worship and fellowship at Harding School of Theology. HST students, faculty, and staff get together for praise, prayer, and a message from God’s word. Because we are a small, graduate-student-only campus, there are many opportunities for students to participate. In fact, chapel is coordinated by the Student Association Vice President.

Speakers for chapel include faculty, staff, students, and guests. Students in preaching classes will deliver sermons on assigned topics. A highlight this past Spring was having faculty members share their spiritual journey. At times, guests will speak via Skype from distant locations.

Chapel meets in the Pittman Chapel 11:00 – 11:30 each day with morning classes. During the typical week chapel is Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, and daily during intensive weeks.

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Church Audit Courses for Fall 2013

July 16, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

HST is offering three enticing church audit courses for Fall 2013. Church audit courses are one way that HST serves local churches. This program blesses congregations which support the school with at least $1200/year ($100/month). Members of these congregations may audit select courses each semester for $25 per course. That’s right – members of these supporting churches can attend the same graduate courses as credit students and learn from world class professors for next to nothing!

An auditor takes a course, but does not receive credit. Some auditors will read all of the assigned texts and even take the exams, others will simply come to the class meetings to hear the lectures.

Fall 2013 Church Audits
Dr. C. Philip SlateGlobal Evangelism: Dr. C. Philip Slate
Mondays, 6-8:45 pm, August 19 – December 9.

An introduction to historical, biblical and cultural aspects of worldwide evangelism, with the purposes of both preparing individuals for service as missionaries and assisting sending churches in their tasks. This involves a survey of principles, methods and practical aspects of developing and maintaining a missions ministry in a local church.

Acts: Dr. Richard E. Oster, Jr.
Thursdays, 6:00 – 8:45 pm, August 22 – December 12.

The purpose of this course is to involve students in the exegesis of selected texts of Acts as well as give them a general knowledge of the content of Acts, of critical “introductory topics,” and of important theological/doctrinal issues.

Dr. Edward J. RobinsonAmerican Restoration Movement: Dr. Edward J. Robinson

This course meets in the one-week-intensive format, October 7-12. Class meets Monday-Friday 8:15-4:00 and Saturday 9:00-noon.

This course surveys the American Restoration Movement from its beginnings with Thomas and Alexander Campbell, Barton W. Stone, and Walter Scott (1800-1830s) through the turbulent years of division (1870-1920s) to the contemporary church of Christ, giving attention to both historical circumstances and theological development

How do I participate?

To help your congregation join this program, contact the Advancement Office at HSTadvancement@hst.edu or by calling 901-761-1355.

Click here to register for a course.

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McMillion’s Legacy

June 17, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

Dr. Phil McMillion will shift from full time to adjunct status this fall. He has taught Old Testament courses at HST for over 20 years. This fitting tribute from Nathan Myers, Master of Divinity student, expresses the respect and appreciation we share for Dr. McMillion.

phillip.mcmillion.2As Dr. Phil McMillion’s time as professor of Old Testament comes to an end, he leaves a legacy that I am blessed to have been a part of, even if for a short time. I have had the privilege to take several classes with Dr. McMillion, including an archaeology class in Greece and Israel May 2011. I distinctly remember one of
his favorite phrases, which he would repeat in every class from behind that ever-present mustache of his: “The Old Testament still has much to say to us today.”

One must look no further than his teaching and his life to know that he, without a doubt, believes this to be true. Dr. McMillion strives to make known the inestimable value and richness of the Old Testament, which still speaks today with illumination and power to the Christian life and community of faith. More than that, he lives it. If the heart of the Old Testament presents a God who engages and relentlessly pursues his creation and his people with the character described in Psalm 86:5 (to name one of several occurrences), then Dr. McMillion certainly is “a man after God’s own heart.” His commitment to biblical scholarship, his teaching excellence, and his gentle and compassionate spirit will be sorely missed. It has been an honor to learn under him and to follow the example of a man who reflects the words of Psalm 1:
“Blessed is the man whose pleasure lies in YHWH’s law and on his law he meditates day and night. He is like a tree planted by streams of water, which produces its fruit in season, and its leaves do not wither — he makes everything that he does thrive.”

This tribute appeared in the Spring 2013 issue of The Bridge.

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Jim Martin

Dr. Jim Martin

Dr. Jim Martin, a Waco, Texas, minister, was selected to become the vice president of Harding School of Theology in Memphis, Tenn.

The announcement was made today by Dr. Bruce D. McLarty, Harding’s president. Martin will assume his new position Jan. 1, 2014. He will succeed Dr. Evertt W. Huffard, who will remain as dean.

Martin is currently the pulpit minister at the Crestview Church of Christ in Waco, Texas, a position he has held since 1993. He has also served congregations in Kansas City, Mo., and Florence, Ala.

In making the announcement of the appointment, McLarty said, “Jim Martin brings a solid background in business, ministry and education to the unique task of leading Harding School of Theology. He has close ties with churches and preachers all across the country. I can’t imagine a better fit for this position. I am thrilled that he has decided to join the administrative team at Harding University.”

At Harding School of Theology, Martin will lead an administrative team including the dean, the director of advancement and the director of admissions. He will also oversee the business office and facilities of the campus.

As vice president for the Memphis campus, Martin will be a member of the president’s cabinet.

Martin holds baccalaureate degrees from University of North Texas and International Bible College. He received two master’s degrees from Abilene Christian University. He received the D.Min. degree from Harding School of Theology in 1988. In 2011 and 2013 he was an adjunct professor at HST.

He currently serves on the board of directors of the Christian Scholarship Foundation, as a mentoring partner for Hope Network Ministries, and as one of six “community leaders” managing Michael Hyatt’s leadership blog, the second-most read leadership blog in the nation.

(from a Harding University Press Release, 6/3/13)

The Spring 2013 issue of The Bridge featured comments from HST alumni on the value of graduate theological education. Due to space constraints, we could only include a few of those statements. Here are additional thoughts to take you beyond the printed page.

Gunnells

Gunnells


Timothy Gunnells

My education raised my level of patience and has helped me to persevere even under difficult circumstances. I gained not only knowledge, but a deeper appreciation of people. The farther along I went in my theological education, the more humble I became in my approach to ministry.

Kevin Jensen

Graduate education blessed me like an inheritance from a rich uncle. My peers in undergraduate studies and in preacher training schools received good increases in knowledge, perspectives, and skills through their education, but I got more through mine. I received what they got, but was taken deeper and broader. The rigors of graduate study stretched me so that I grew in dependence on God and in self-discipline. Since my graduation twelve years ago, I’ve frequently been grateful for HST’s network of peer and faculty relationships and library support that continues to provide me and my church with new resources and training opportunities for ministry today.

Nesmith

Nesmith


James Nesmith

Graduate theological education has changed my life as a minister in two ways. First, it has humbled me to appreciate all that I do not know. In ministry, preachers are challenged to have all the answers; to offer conclusive, rigid, and unaltering truths and proclamations. This can lead to a pat perspective in which the minister feels that he knows all he needs to know and can refrain from the exploration of additional or competing thoughts and ideas.

This leads me to the second impact of graduate theological education upon my life. We live in an information age. While a preacher is in the pulpit, members can be on their smartphones Googling the information he is presenting to ensure its accuracy. The training I received at HST in critical thinking, research methods, analytical comparison, and theological reflection enables me, by God’s grace, to speak with accuracy and confidence. I do not have all the answers, but the answers I have are sure and solid even as I work my way toward additional answers. This confident progression is appreciated by the congregation, and we move together toward greater understanding and application of the word of God as we engage in his service in downtown Richmond.

James T. Wood

I see the benefit of my education in two veins. On the one side, I was forced to grapple with the deeper issues of faith and ministry and equipped to find the answers. On the other side, I was connected to an invaluable network of ministry partners around the globe that are graciously willing to help me.
I do see one major flaw with graduate education in theology that needs to be addressed: the overwhelming emphasis on academics over application has a tendency to erode spiritual health while it strengthens intellectual ability. We can’t sacrifice one for the other. We need to train ministers who are both spiritually filled and academically prepared.

Posted in Across the Bridge, Theology

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The Bridge: Spring 2013

May 30, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

BridgeLogoInside the Spring 2013 issue of The Bridge:

  • HST’s mission statement declares that we challenge Christian leaders to deeper faith in God and higher standards of ministry and scholarship. Why do we pursue scholarship? What is the value of graduate theological training? Why should anyone embrace the rigor, expense, and duration of HST’s degree programs?
    This issue of The Bridge explores these questions from the perspective of faculty, alumni, and students.
  • Burks

    Burks

  • HST honors Dr. David B. Burks on his retirement as president of Harding University ending a 26-year ministry in that role
  • Dr. Rodney Plunket named Alumnus of the Year
  • Updates on events and happenings on campus
  • Resources for a deeper exploration of topics mentioned in The Bridge

Read or download The Bridge: Spring 2013.

Go Across the Bridge to learn more about the topics of this issue.

Read other issues of The Bridge.


Posted in The Bridge

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Congratulations to the Class of 2013!

May 21, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

Dr. David B. Burks

Dr. David B. Burks

HST graduated 25 students (26 degrees!) Saturday, May 18. Dr. David B. Burks, who is retiring after 26 years as president of Harding University, delivered the commencement address. Dr. Allen Black, Professor of New Testament, gave the message from the faculty, and President-Designate Dr. Bruce McLarty offered the benediction. Dr. Leon Sanderson, President of the HST Alumni Association, served as worship leader.

There were many highlights of the day, but two stand out.

Quintin Baker

Baker in the HST Library

First, Quintin Baker, an HST student who passed away last summer at the age of 26, was honored with a Certificate of Recognition. His family was present and Patrick Baker, Quintin’s father, addressed the graduates and their families with a message of hope at the luncheon following commencement.

Second, Kyle Hooper graduated with the Master of Divinity. Kyle’s father and grandfather are also HST alumni, which makes Kyle the first third-generation student to graduate from HST.

The audience sings "The Lord Bless You and Keep You" to our graduates.

The audience sings “The Lord Bless You and Keep You” to our graduates.

 

And now, the class of 2013:

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts is an academically focused degree with a thesis requirement.

Glenn R. Hawley
James Andrew Sowers
John Paul Suchecki

Master of Arts in Christian Ministry

The MACM is a specialized degree focusing on a specific ministry area such as church planting, missions, or youth ministry.

Alan T. Arneson
Stephan Mark Connors
Marek Dawidow
Jared King
Christine Lynette Parker
Joe Thomas Spivy, Jr.

Master of Arts in Counseling

The MA in Counseling degree fulfills the educational requirement to sit for licensure as a Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT) or a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) for the state of Tennessee.

Michelle Bates
Jessi R. Berger
David Edwin Mars
James Michael Piiparinen
Anastasia R. Randolph

Master of Divinity

The M.Div. degree is a broad degree (84 semester hours) that prepares students for a lifetime of ministry and leadership.

Gary Franklin Baird
Minku Andrew Chang
Chase Brandon Froud
Charles E. Fulbright, Jr.
Dennis Kyle Hooper
Chauncey Smith Hopkins
Craig M. Poole
Lewis Edward Short, III
James Andrew Sowers

Doctor of Ministry

The D.Min. degree builds on the work of the M.Div. and gives ministers even greater skills for their particular area of ministry. The dissertation focuses on an area of their current ministry setting.

Matthew Wayne Morine
Ryan Donald Richardson
Thomas Shannon Snow

Congratulations!

Posted in Academic, News and Events

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HST Community Bloggers

May 6, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

There is a new page on the HST website dedicated to our students, faculty, and alumni who have blogs. Following these blogs is a great way to get to know us as a community and to learn about the work God is doing around the world through the HST family.

If you know of other blogs that should be included on this list, please let us know via the contact page or on Facebook.

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Meredith honored with HU’s Distinguished Teacher Award

April 24, 2013 | Written by Matt Carter

Don Meredith

Don Meredith

Many life experiences feature rites of passage that help a group transition from one phase to the next. These rites aren’t always pleasant, but they are essential for training us for the next stage in life. Most of us enjoy driving, but few relish days spent in driver’s training. High school football was fun, but summer’s two-a-days were not. Our affection for our first paycheck surpassed our love for the first Monday we awoke to the blare of an early alarm. We endure the rites because they put us into position to flourish during our experiences.

The memory of many students of the Harding School of Theology is etched with the red ink of one common rite of passage: the 5990 Advanced Theological Research course. The iconic Annie May Lewis served as the chief architect of the class, but since 1983 it has been the craft of her prized-mentee, Don Meredith.

from a 1977 slide show

from a 1977 slide show

Last week, head librarian Don Meredith received the Teacher Achievement Award from Harding University. The award, no doubt, honored his time spent teaching the class, which he has offered nearly every semester since 1983. But it also honored the way that he has used the class as a rite of passage into the rest of the program. When students reflect about their time at HST, they often share stories of their term papers from that first class, which are still wet with red ink from Meredith’s famous multi-colored pen. Like the soldiers who fought with Henry V on St. Crispin’s Day, survivors of 5990 can count themselves the “few, we happy few, we band of brothers.”

This band of brothers and sisters thanks you, Mr. Meredith, for giving us the tools we needed to become the students we wanted to be.

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